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20130228
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Feb 1, 2013 11:00pm PST
>> welcome to the program. tonight we begin with new orleans the city, and three people who recently moved back here because of their love of it. reflecting are james carville, mary matalin and julia reed. >> so what do you love about being here? >> let us count the ways. >> this is the way that i can explain new orleans. everybody else talks about a quality of life. you live in washington,-- the mondayments, the buildings, the kennedy center, the universities, the great medical centres, very highly rated quality of life. here no one ever speaks of the quality of life, it's a way of life. we have our music, our food, our social structure, our architecture, our body of literature. we even have our own funerals. so weeasure qlity of life by way of life, if our way of iv is intact and our culture is intact, then that's fine. and we don't really, in a big part of our way of life is to be comfortable with our otherness. we really don't aspire. we love to go to new york. we love to go to las vegas, and we love to go to washington, or anywhere. >> rose: even paris. >> paris who wou
PBS
Feb 24, 2013 10:00am PST
. >>> and kim lawton on a group trying to document every house of worship in new york city, block by block. >> major funding for "religion and ethics weekly" is profounded by lilian, dedicated to the founders' interest in religion and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >> welcom i'm bob abeeth it's good to have you with us. anticipation is growing over the selection of the next pope, following pope benedict xvi's surprise announcement that he is retiring. at one of his final public appearances, benedict asked for prayers for himself and his successor. he then entered a week long retreat amid wide speculation that the papal conclave might begin before march 15th, giving the cardinals more time to select the next pope before holy week. meanwhile, some american catholics are demanding cardinal roger mahony not attend the conclave because of his role in the clergy sex abuse crisis. recently released documents show t
PBS
Feb 18, 2013 9:00pm PST
-- implement a public finance system based on new york city. it works well in new york city. it will work well in new york state. >> do you think he's serious? >> i do think he's serious. >> how will he prove he's serious? >> well, he'll prove his seriousnessy getting this bill paed in the ming legislature. i think we can have confidence that the governor will be able to pass something that is called campaign finance reform in this state. the real test and measure is going to be whether it includes this citizen funding. >> how would public funding work? >> well, it can work a lot of different ways. for obvious reasons it's most useful to point to new york city when you're in new york state. here we have a system in the city if you're running for citywide office or for city council, any contribution up to, you qualify to get into the systemyou ect to be in the system, it's voluntary. then any contribution up to $175 is matched six to one -- >> by the public? >> by the public. out of a pool from the general fund from the budget. and that has had a dramatic transformative effect in the way that f
PBS
Feb 8, 2013 10:00pm PST
-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was de ssible b the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: millions of people in the northeast and new england battened down for a weekend blizzard today. forecasters warned it could be one for the record books. by this afternoon, the gathering storm was beginning to whiten the landscape for hundreds of miles, with long
PBS
Feb 1, 2013 5:30pm PST
,500 troops. they've been in mali for four weeks fighting against islamic extremists. in mexico city, rescue workers kept up their search for survivors of an explosion at the offices of mexico's state-run oil company. the blast happened late yesterday, killing at least 33 people and wounding 121 others. rescue workers dug through the rubble of the basement and first three floors of the building ere about 2 people worked. e causof t blast is still unknown and authorities are investigating. the retired cardinal of los angeles, roger mahony, was relieved of all his public duties today by his successor. it came as the diocese released thousands of previously secret documents showing he shielded priests who sexually abused children decades ago. the public censure was unparalleled in the american catholic church. mahony will still be able to celebrate mass and can vote for pope until he turns 80, two years from now. u.s. secretary of energy stephen chu announced today he's stepping dn. during his tenure, he came under fire for the handling of a solar energy loan to solyndra. it later went bankrupt
PBS
Feb 6, 2013 5:00pm PST
the mission. many filed alongside malian forces to regain control of northern cities. a government spokesperson said a withdraw would depend on traini malian troops. e frch and the alls continued to run into some insurgents outside major cities. they got into a fire fight on tuesday. they fear they could creep back into cities they wouldn't held. riots have broken out in tunisia after an official was shot dead. a leading member of the secular popular front party. he suffer is multiple gunshot wounds in the head and chest. the after the arab spring uprising in 2011. he said the culprit will be arrested. the murder sparked protests in tunis and around the country. tunisia has been gripped by instability and economic hardship. party leaders came to power making promises but they see problems before the arab spring. >>> executives seem happier with the recent economic climate. tell us what's changed. >> we've had a new government in japan and stock prices went higher. all of this seems to be working in the favor of boosting confidence for japan's manufacturing. orders for manufacture c
PBS
Feb 8, 2013 4:30pm PST
flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also be historic. weather forecasters predict it will leave up to three feet of snow in a wide swath stretching from new york to boston. preparations are well underway. airlines cancelled nearly 4,500 flights, leaving many travelers stranded. >> here at laguardia, as you can see, our port authority men and women are hard at work preparing for the storm. our fleet of snow removal vehicles and sand and agent spreaders are prepped and ready for action. >> reporter: amtrak has also canceled many trips in the northeast. the storm is expected to deliver a harsh blow to areas of the east coast still recovering from superstorm sandy. >> hurricane sandy cost the economy a $100 billion and the recovery efforts are still
PBS
Feb 22, 2013 5:30pm PST
, "after newtown" wraps up tonight with a report from chicago on the public health crisis in the city in the wake of rising gun violence. >> the people who come in after having been shot are some of the highest risk folks. these are people who have been shot, who may have been shot before, and really without some intervention, without some life- changing moment, the trajectory's either going to be jail or death. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and, as a magistrate grants oscar pistorius bail, we talk to charlayne hunter gault about how his arrest has focused attention on the unusually high rate of violence against women in south africa. >> domestic violence is shot through the entire society from the highest of the highed in socioeconomic terms to the lowest of the low. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100
PBS
Feb 26, 2013 4:30pm PST
is that the price gains were widespread throughout the nation-- 19 out of 20 cities posted increases. the lone exception was new york city, where prices dipped a half a percent. there was more data today reaffirming the housing market recovery. new home sales surged almost 16% in january, lotore an expected and the biggest jump in nearly two decades. so what's behind the turnaround in the housing market? >> the biggest factor is just the fact that prices have fallen to such a level that there are enough willing buyers that see value in this market to come in and basically provide a floor. >> reporter: in fact, investors continue to purchase about nearly one out of every five homes. many real estate experts predict home prices will continue to rise this year, fueled by a dwindling number of properties on the market. in january, the supply of homes for sale fell to its lowest level in nearly eight years. for most people, the biggest impediment to buying a home is not credit score or income. >> it's down payment. most people don't have enough spare cash laying around that they are able to qualify
PBS
Jan 31, 2013 11:00pm PST
in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i spoke to him on tuesday if he 90-- 29nd street y here in new york and here is part of that conversation. >> i should take note of the fact that this book is dedicated to his mother, pauline gore o ddt age 92 in 2004, his father died when he was 90. this is good genes, i'm telling you here. and in the dedication he said she gave me a future and a an abiding curiosity about what it holds and a sense of our commune human ablegation to help shape it. so this book is about the question of what are the drivers that are chan
PBS
Feb 18, 2013 11:00pm PST
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: michelle rhee is here. she is one of those widely known and perhaps most controversial figures in education. she served as chancellor of the d.c. public school system from 2007 to 2010. her sweeping reforms and hard-nosed style have changed the national debate ov school refo. sh has written a new book about her vision for american education. it's called "radical: fighting to put students first." i am pleased to have michelle rhee back at this table. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: why did you call it "radical"? >> you know, when i started the job in d.c. i was -- i took over the lowest performing and dysfunctional school district in the entire nation. so i started making very rapid changes. i started closing down low-performing schools, removing ineffective educators, icut a central office beaucracy in half. to me those seemed like really obvious moves to make. >> rose: right. >> what was interesting, though, is people started saying "she's a lightning rod, she's radical, she's d
PBS
Feb 21, 2013 5:30pm PST
obesity have intensified in recent years. last september, for instance, new york city's board of health limited sugared drinks and sodas to 16 ounces or less. mayor michael bloomberg praised the prohibition that takes effect march 12th. >> this is the single biggest step any city i think has taken to curb obesity, but certainly not the last step that lots of cities are going to take. and we believe that it will help save lives. >> suarez: and today, continuing her long-running "let's move" campaign, first lady michelle obama-- along with big bird of "sesame street"-- issued new public service announcements encouraging kids to get active and eat healthy. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging! >> suarez: if a "healthy" trend is developing, it still has a long way to go. as of 2012, the c.d.c. estimated more than one-third of american adults and one out of three of children were obese. we examine today's numbers and the larger challenges obesity still present
PBS
Feb 18, 2013 5:00pm PST
. >>> visitors to the city office near tokyo are enjoying a display of elegance in miniature form. represent members of the nobility and the customes they wore. citizen groups are showing off an extensive collection. the dolls are the centerpiece of a festival every march. families set them out as a way to pray for good health for their daughters. craftsman have been making the dolls for nearly 400 years. residents collected more than 1,800 dolls from all over the country. they're displaying them to draw attention and visitors. the dolls at the top are seven meters off the floor. >> translator: they reach right up to the ceiling. they're amazing. >> translator: it's wonderful to see something big like this. >> the dolls will be on display until march 9th. >>> people who travel a long way to see natural beauty. mountains, water falls, sunsets. but what about fog? residents of one misty town claim their unusual climate is worth the trip. >> reporter: a chilly winter morning. dawn breaks. a dense fog forms in the mountains sweeps down the river valley. and out to sea. locals call this a storm.
PBS
Feb 5, 2013 4:30pm PST
, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why the super bowl blackout means it's time for the cities that host professional sports teams to focus on the basics. >> tom: stocks were back in the green after suffering their biggest sell-off in months yesterday. one encouraging sign came from the service sector. the non-manufacturing index slipped in january from december, but not as much as feared, according to the institute of supply management. the employment index was at its highest level in almost seven years. the dow gained 100, the nasdaq increased 40, the s&p was up almost 16. >> susie: the u.s. government made it official today. it filed a suit against standard and poors' credit agency for giving optimistic ratings on troubled securities that later failed and contributed to the financial crisis. the justice department could seek as much as $5 billion from s&p. it claims that's the amount of money federally insured financial institutions lost because of s&p's alleged wrongdoing. the government claims s&p ratings services knowingly executed a "scheme to defraud investors." >> duri
PBS
Feb 7, 2013 5:30pm PST
have grown up in the city's roughest neighborhoods where they have already developed an inner strength remarkable for their age. >>ften times those skill sets are not point pointed as assets. often times kids think that they walk into this environment with liabilities. we think it's completely opposite. >> reporter: once the students move on to college they stay in regular contact with their one goal teacher through their first year. the aim is not just to get kids into college but to equip them with the support system they need to finish. >> we've seen 20, 25 years of education reform in the united states. almost all of it has been directed in prek through 12 which has -- so we see that proliferation of charter schools we've seen early childhood interventions work, we've seen human capital providers, we've seen big city mayors like rahm emanuel take over education yet almost none of it has spread to higher education. so our country has begun to get college access right but we see huge dropout rates in college. >> reporter: cynthia barren is a coach with the university of illinois at c
PBS
Feb 27, 2013 11:00pm PST
continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: carmelo anthony is here. he is one of the best basketball players in the world. he is a six-time n.b.a. all-star and two-time olympic gold medal winner. this saturday his college jersey was retired in syracuse where he led his team to an n.c.a.a. championship in 2003. here's some footage from the ceremony. >> carmelo anthony not only won us a national championship, he helped us build our program to a completely other level by helping us build the carmelo anthony center. and this is from a guy who was here one year and he's brought so much to syracuse basketball beyondhe nation championship that he has really left a legacy for syracuse basketball. (cheers and applause) >> today a syracuse legend to have his jersey retired, please join us, carmelo anthony. (cheers and applause) >> rose: in 2003, carmelo was drafted by the denver nuggets in 2011 he was traded to the place where he was born, new york city. right now the new york nicks are in second place in the eastern conf
PBS
Feb 12, 2013 4:30pm PST
. besides mardi gras, it's also still riding high from hosting the super bowl. the city's tourism officials say one million people are in town for the festivities. now, that's more than five times as many people who showed up for the super bowl. new orleans' economy took a big hit when hurricane katrina struck in 2005, but these big turnouts are helping its economic comeback. >> tourism is our most important industry. it's a $5 billion industry for new orleans. it employs 75,000 of our local citizens, so it is absolutely critical that we continue to do events like mardi gras, super bowls, final fours, big conventions, business meetings. that is the lifeblood of the city. >> susie: she also says this year's mardi gras is expected to bring in almost $150 million and that the planning never stops. tomorrow, new orleans will start working on mardi gras 2014. well, that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, february 12. have a great evening, everyone. we'll see you online at www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.w
PBS
Jan 31, 2013 5:30pm PST
have occupied the airport at a third key city-- kidal. in paris today, the french defense minister said his government is open to having u.n. peacekeepers take over, with french support. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we turn to two stories about conflict in the middle east. as the battle in syria between president bashar al-assad's forces and the free syrian army or f.s.a. rages on, thousands of refugees flood into neighboring countries. jonathan miller of "independent television news" takes us to a secret crossing point on the border with jordan on the outskirts of the syrian city of da'-raa. >> reporter: katiba jaber is a lonely place, exposed to desert winds that chill you to the bone. the border guard is ready for what the night will bring. ( gunfire ) the shooting started shortly after sunset. those are close. the syrians fire at the jordanians every night but the jordanians don't fire back. and bashar's forces shoot and shell the groups of refugees hiding somewhere down there in the darkness. unexpectedly, a jordanian ambulance arrives
PBS
Feb 6, 2013 11:00pm PST
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: associate justice sonia tomayor is here. she made history in 2009 when she became the first hispanic and the third woman to sit on the supreme court. her story embodies the american dream. she grew up in a public housing project in the south bronx. at age seven she was diagnosed with type one diabetes. her father a factory worker died the following year. she and her younger brother were raised by a single mom who worked long hours just to make ends meet. but adversity did not stop her from ascending to the top of her profession. she went from high school valedictorian to princeton graduate to law review editor at yale. she served as a prosecutor and a corpate late gator before she was appointed as a district court judge. while still in her 30s. and then was appointed to the court of appeals. 11 years later she was sworn in as the nation's 111th justice. she tells her personal story in a new memoir. is it called "my beloved world." i am very pleased to have justice sonia sotomayor at this table for the first time. we
PBS
Feb 8, 2013 11:00pm PST
our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the united states constitution is over 225 years old. though our nation has transformed since the document was ratified, this text has remained largely unchanged. some scholars question relevance of the constitution in the modern day, others insist we must strictly adhere to the words of our founders, akhil amar suggests that we look beyond the text. he is the sterling professor at yale law school and a constitutional law scholar. his new book is called america's unwritten constitution, the precedence and principleses we live by. i am pleased to have him at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> so what about this love affair with the constitution that you have, did it come from undergraduate z it come from law school, did it come from some sense of america and its -- >> it came from the day that i was born and because the day i'm born in ann arbor, michigan, my parents are not u.s. citizens. they ever's students, they're, they were here to do their medical training. they met in ann arbor and because of the first sentence o
PBS
Feb 7, 2013 11:00pm PST
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: benh zeitlin is here. when he made his direct orial debut "beast of the southern wild" last year it became a movie everybody is talking b the story of hush puppie a 9-year-old girl faced with the illness of her father. it became the runnaway hit of lastr's film festival skirt winning awards at sundance and at cannes and now nominated for four academy awards including best director and best picture. here is the trailer of beasts of the southern wild. >> the whole universe depends on everything fitting together just right. if one piece busts, even the smallest pie, the entire universe -- >> this here is an auroch, a fierce creature. >> the storm's coming. >> the you all better learn how to survive. >> it is pie job to take care of you, okay? >> all was iet goes hine my eyes, i see everything that made made me. >> flying around in invisible pieces. i see that i'm a little piece of a big, big universe. >> you going to be the king, i promise that. >> in a million years, when kid goes to s
PBS
Feb 25, 2013 9:00pm PST
and what to do about it." he's now a visiting professor at the new school here in new york city where he's teaching a special course on the financial crash. welcome, richard wolff. >> thank you, bill. >> last night i watched for the second time the popular lecture that is on this dvd, "capitalism hits the fan." tell us why you say capitalism has hit the fan. >> well, the classic defense of capitalism as a system for much of its history has been, okay, it has this or that flaw. but it "delivers the goods." >> yeah, for most everybody. >> right. >> that was the argument. >> and so you may not get the most, but it'll trickle down to you, all the different ways. >> the yachts will rise. >> that's right. the ocean will lift all the boats. the reality is that for at least 30 years now, that isn't true. for the majority of people, capitalism is not delivering the goods. it is delivering, arguably, the bads. and so we have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, but a growing majority in this society which isn't gettin
PBS
Feb 12, 2013 6:00pm PST
that are there. now at schools like p-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools and city university of new york and i.b.m., students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate's degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. and four years ago... ( applause ) four years ago we started race to the top, the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards. all for about 1% of what we ve spent on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge: to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. and we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools, most young people will need some higr education. the simple fact that the more education you'v
PBS
Feb 22, 2013 4:30pm PST
, maybe two. peak travel to key cities could be snarled by late march. smaller airports may have to shut down altogether. you can find the list on the department of transportation's website. the administration denies these announcements are part of a campaign to pressure house republicans to change course and head off the cuts. >> the idea that we are doing this to create some kind of horrific scare tactic is nonsense. we are required to cut a billion dollars. and if more than half of our employees are at the f.a.a., the f.a.a.-- there has to be some impact. >> reporter: and the f.a.a. cuts don't include potential delays from cutbacks as t.s.a. furloughs employees. the defense department has already informed 800,000 workers they may be furloughed and face a 20% paycut as it struggles to find a way to cut $46 billion from its budget. adding it all up, the president warns the picture is not pretty. >> the overall impact to the recovery will be to slow down the recovery. and not only may there end up being direct job loss, but, because the economy is softer, it also means that we're not goi
PBS
Feb 7, 2013 9:00pm PST
which made a mockery of citi credit policy. >> if you take an organization like citigroup, for example-- people involved in due diligence like richard bowen signaled up the line all the way up to robert rubin that something was wrong, that they were finding that some 60% of mortgages they were buying weren't meeting their standards. mr. bowen sent you an e-mail. >> narrator: in one exchange, the commission asked citibank's robert rubin to respond to bowen's e-mail. >> did you ever act on that? >> mr. chairman, i do recollect this and that either i or somebody else-- and i truly do not remember who-- but either i or somebody else sent it to the appropriate people. >> narrator: rubin told angelides that actions were taken to improve the bank's due diligence operations. but his recollections were vague. >> i certainly don't remember today whether i knew at the time or not. i truly don't. >> if the excuse at the top was, "we didn't know," that's a prty pr exse fm pele who are hauling down $10 million, $20 million, $30 million, or, in robert rubin's case, $115 million. >> narrator: bowen wa
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)